The Good Participatory Practise Guidelines

The Good Participatory Practise Guidelines

The Good Participatory Practise Guideline (GPP) were developed by UNAIDS in partnership with AVAC to provide trial funders, sponsors, and implementers with a systematic guidance on how to effectively engage with stakeholders in the design and conduct of biomedical HIV prevention trials. In the GPP guidelines, ‘design and conduct of biomedical HIV prevention trials’ refers to the activities required for the development, planning, implementation, and trial closure, including dissemination of trial results. In order to ensure optimal implementation of the GPP guidelines, research projects should adhere to the six guiding GPP principles set by the guidelines including: respect, transparency, integrity, transparency, accountability and autonomy.

About the GPP Leadership Course

Through support provided by the USAID-Funded and AVAC-led Coalition to Accelerate and Support Prevention Research (CASPR), Wits RHI in partnership with AVAC has developed a five-day GPP Leadership Training Course to develop and cultivate a senior cadre of GPP ambassadors, trainers and leaders who are primed to champion GPP in the communities and countries where they work, who will in turn help to identify, train and nurture the next generation of stakeholder engagement practitioners.

The GPP Leadership Programme builds on existing GPP trainings and resources to provide individuals already working in the area of GPP and/or experienced with GPP with a structured programme including participatory learning approaches, practicums and exercises to advance participants’ leadership skills around GPP training and implementation.

AIM OF THE COURSE

To develop and nurture a senior cadre of GPP ambassadors, trainers and leaders both in trial implementing and donor countries with heavy policy influence that will serve to strengthen and support stakeholder engagement and enabling research environments in the communities and countries where they work.

PARTICIPANTS

Research implementers, research advocates and other key implementation partners and influencers working in clinical research and implementation science, with a primary focus (though not exclusively) on HIV biomedical prevention research, TB and emerging infectious diseases (e.g. Ebola, Zika).